Category Archives: Challenging Corporate Rule

Lawrence Lessig on Restoring Democracy in the US

The final talk of the 2014 Amos Fortune Forum will take place at the Jaffrey Center Meetinghouse on August 22 and feature Lawrence Lessig on “Achieving Equal Citizenship: The Struggle to Restore Our Republic.” Lessig will explore how we, the citizens of the United States, have lost touch with our framers’ values, and how that has destroyed the promise of a “Republic.” He will outline a pathway of reform and citizen activism that can turn the tide and restore self-government of, by, and for the people. Admission to all the forums are free but donations are always welcome. For more information, visit http://www.amosfortune.com.

Achieving Equal Citizenship: The Struggle To Restore Our Republic

Most Americans feel disenfranchised from their democracy — and they’re right. In this talk, Professor Lessig outlines precisely how we have lost touch with our framers’ values, and how that has destroyed the promise of a “Republic.” Professor Lessig explains how recent efforts, including the “New Hampshire Rebellion” and MayOne, the “SuperPAC to end all SuperPACs”, are mobilizing citizens to form a movement capable of restoring the Republic that the framers intended.

Lawrence Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School, director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University, and founder of Rootstrikers, a network of activists leading the fight against government corruption. He has authored numerous books, including Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Our Congress—and a Plan to Stop It, Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Free Culture, and Remix.

Lessig serves on the Boards of Creative Commons, AXA Research Fund and iCommons.org, and on the Advisory Boards of the Sunlight Foundation, the Better Future Project, and Democracy Café. He is a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Association, and has received numerous awards, including the Free Software Foundation’s Freedom Award, Fastcase 50 Award and being named one of Scientific American’s Top 50 Visionaries.

Lessig holds a BA in economics and a BS in management from the University of Pennsylvania, an MA in philosophy from Cambridge, and a JD from Yale. As Professor at Stanford Law School, Lessig founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society. He clerked for Judge Richard Posner on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Antonin Scalia on the United States Supreme Court.

Popular Economics Education Training of Trainers

United for a Fair Economy is once again partnering with the Highlander Center in New Market, TN to present our Popular Economics Education Training of Trainers Institute. We will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality, connect the dots among our struggles, and provide participants with popular education tools for informing their communities, inspiring political action, and building a powerful social movement for economic and social justice. Read More…

Democracy Matters’ Campus Leadership Program Opportunity

Paid Political internship – Organize Antioch Students for Campaign Finance Reform – Apply now! Starts with fall semester.

Democracy Matters is accepting applications for paid internships through our Campus Internship Program. We are a non-partisan organization of students and professors working on campuses across the country to educate people about the role of private money in politics, and its impact on democracy. We call for alternatives that can reform and revitalize our political process thereby deepening democracy in the United States. Specifically, we organize around issues of campaign finance reform, full and partial funding of elections, and election reform.

We differ from other political groups on campus in that we are not linked to a political party and we do not concern ourselves with specific election campaigns. Instead, we are concerned with the process of campaigns – especially fundraising – and issues specifically related to political accountability and democracy.

Campus Leaders are expected to work a minimum of 10 hours/week.

Responsibilities:

  • Build coalitions of student activists on your campus.
  • Create a Democracy Matters chapter that can work with students, faculty and community activists to get private money out of politics and people back in.
  • Organize at least four campaigns/events per semester.

    Opportunities:

  • Receive training and guidance from a Democracy Matter staff link who will work with you each week to develop your skills as an organizer.
  • Attend the annual Democracy Matters student summit where you will meet with hundreds of other students from across the country and attend workshops to build your skills and issue awareness.
  • Receive Democracy Matters materials – banner, flyers, DVD, t-shirt, stickers, and pins – to spread across your campus.

    Compensation:

  • $500 per semester if needed
  • Additional financial support for campaign/event expenses
  • Service learning course credit (depends on college/university)

    Applicants should have a commitment to social change and some organizing experience. No expertise in campaign finance reform is required.

    Apply today! Email your resume, at least three academic or professional references and cover letter to DemocracyPartnersRecruiting@gmail.com

    Please see our website, DemocracyMatters.org for additional information.

Antioch’s Advocacy Program Hosting A Local “Democracy School” on April 11 and 12

On Friday evening (April 11) and all day Saturday (April 12), Antioch’s Advocacy program, New Hampshire Citizen’s Alliance, and the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund are all teaming up to host one of CELDF’s groundbreaking “Democracy School” workshops for interested area folks.  This is the second Democracy School that Antioch University New England has hosted and we think this is an ideal next educational step for area people who are looking for creative ways that local communities can act together to challenge excessive corporate power and better promote local democracy and community resilience.

There are even a few slots open at this point and registration has been extended until Monday, March 31. You can download the Registration Form here. Also, you can contact CELDF’s local organizer Jan if you have more questions. Below is a short video about the Democracy School workshops and below that is a longer talk by Thomas Linsey, CELDF’s founder explaining how they developed this innovative “outside the box” organizing strategy to challenge corporate power and promote local democracy and community resilience.

Democracy School Promo Video

 

Thomas Linzey Lecture on the Evolution of “Rights-Based Organizing”